How One Shift Can Lead to a Healthier Life





Jeffrey Boadi is a health and wellness advocate who shares about all things plant based food and lifestyle. He runs his own blog, The Health of Wealth, where he digs deeper into issues surrounding the intersections of race, socio-economic issues, food poverty, trust of the media, living a conscious life and more. In this episode we dive into all of those topics and more. Jeffrey reminds us all to share important information that we have with the world because change has to start somewhere.


Please note, this episode has been transcribed by a computer, expect some typos!


Carly Puch

Welcome back to another episode of Consciously Clueless. I'm your host, Carly, and I'll be your guide on this journey from cluelessness to consciousness and back around again. Today on the podcast I talked to Jeffrey Boadi. Jeffrey is a Health and Wellness Advocate that uses his platforms to share plant based food and lifestyle info. He runs his own blog, the wealth of health, where he talks about everything from socio economic issues and food poverty, racism and health is veganism expensive, and much more. Jeffrey and I talked about really important things like about how when you let go, really amazing things usually start to happen, or about how all change has to start somewhere. I really am excited for you to hear this episode. So thank you, again, for joining. I'm really excited to be talking to you this morning, or this afternoon for you, I guess. So this podcast is called consciously clueless. And for me, that was this perfect embodiment of what I wanted to talk about. And it's those moments where we feel like we're really conscious and with it, and we're totally killing it at life. And then those moments where we feel clueless and have no idea what's going on and everything in between. So I'm kind of curious to just check in with you and ask where do you feel like you are on that continuum right now.

Jeffrey Boadi

Um, I guess we're especially being an interesting time in the world at the moment, it almost makes you kind of zero in on a lot of your choices as well, because you've got a lot of time at home a lot of time thinking to yourself, so I guess there's that kind of space to think a lot about your choices from a from a perspective as well. Whether that be your dietary choices, lifestyle choices, how you treat people, you know, family, all those kinds of things. It all kind of zeroes in so I think it's an interesting time, I'd say on that spectrum. I'm, you know, some days I can be really focused and conscious of what I'm doing. And other days, it's, you know, maybe not so much. So, yeah, it's all a bit of a bit of a balancing act in the moment. But in terms of trying to maintain a decent level, I'd say I'm trying to do my best there.

Carly Puch

Yeah, I think that's the thing that has been really interesting during this time. And I've talked about this a lot, but it keeps coming up just the idea of I think I used to think of it as like, oh, take it day by day, or these last few months have made me really think okay, everything is moment by moment. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Yeah, it switches so quickly of what's going on and how I'm feeling.

Jeffrey Boadi

Yeah, definitely. There's why always, there's a book that I've read called The Power of Now I'm sure you've read that when I read that book that kind of really shaped my perspective in terms of just being in that moment, and not thinking too far ahead about the next woman, I think, too, in the past about what's previously gone on. And that changed, that changed life a lot in terms of my perspective, and how I looked at things, just maintaining that focus on this is what's going on in this specific moment. You know, take it for what it is accept it for what it is, and then just live life like that. So

Carly Puch:3:16

absolutely. It's been a while since I've read that it might be time for me to pick it up again, and remind myself,

Jeffrey Boadi

yeah, definitely, I've definitely been meaning to give it a second read for sure.

Carly Puch

So your Instagram page is full of so much good information. And it's such a cool, informative place to learn. And then it led me to your blog, which we talked about the other day. So I first want to just hear how did you become plant based? Where did that start? Well, it's

Jeffrey Boadi

interesting story, which I was thinking about the other day, as always, because it's been a bit of a long journey in the United in that aspect. And I think where it started was, my sister told me about a documentary called what the health on Netflix, and I was, I'd always been quite health conscious anyway, I'd pay a lot of sport growing up. You know, I thought I was eating a healthy diet for an athlete, you know, taking my vitamins or supplements and all that kind of stuff. And you told me about how this documentary looked at the links between diet and disease and a lot of the political aspects of government subsidies from certain big industries for you know, to move themselves forward. So it really kind of piqued my interest. I gave her a watch and I watched it once and then I watched it the second time again with my now fiance and literally overnight, cut everything out of my diet, meat dairy. Oh, wow. And I ate a lot of meat, dairy, eggs and fish like animal. Obviously growing up in a Ghanaian household, where Okay, meat is just a staple, every single pretty much every dinner is meat, and every meal is there's got there's an animal product on the plate otherwise No, essentially not a meal. So yeah, just come completely cut everything out. And I think it was mainly driven by a couple of factors. So the health side of things in terms of knowing that I could maximize my longevity by cutting out animal products and adopting a plant based diet. And then there was other things in terms of civil rights issues, which I've now kind of been more vocal about my page. So in the film, it does talk a lot about how certain areas in because especially especially in America, they almost like targeted people of color. And a lot of the runoff from a lot of the agricultural waste is kind of pumped into these communities of color, raising their disease levels massively. And I just didn't really want to be a part of that I didn't want to partake in that in any kind of way. I mean, in terms of my personal health, I could probably get away with eating meat once a week, twice a week, probably wouldn't do, right. But I just didn't want to be a part of, you know, supporting industries that I knew were doing so much damage on a human level, on a ecological level to the environment. It just didn't really sit right with me. So for me, it was just, it was a very easy decision to make. So yeah, pretty much overnight switch, and then took a couple of months, they six to eight weeks to really kind of get an understanding of how to properly plan a plant based diet. So yeah, it was again now just you know, still doing it. So thriving, so feeling great. And I immediately noticed so many different benefits from it. So

Carly Puch

what were the benefits? You notice? I read an article that you wrote for the medium? Yes. And that talked about that. But can you talk a little bit more about Yeah,

Jeffrey Boadi

so the the immediate benefits that I know is my sleep was just unbelievable. So I'd always typically, I'd always try and chase like eight hours, sleep. But I always feel tired in the mornings, I still feel tired. And I always have to have a nap during the day or at some point. But I've now just felt like I could just go to sleep very easily. And I'd wake up with energy. Like sometimes I don't even have to use my alarm clock, I just jumped straight out of bed with a lot of energy, which I didn't have before. I felt a lot lighter. I felt like I had more energy during the day. In terms of my training in the gym, there was no difference there. Like I did actually notice that my recovery times got quicker from heavy kind of, you know, resistance training sessions. So yeah, I think the sleep form was really interesting, though, because I'd always wondered why I was always so tired in the mornings. Because that didn't really work. That didn't sit right with me. I'd think eight hour sleep was more than enough. Why am I tired? But now, seven hours sleep and I feel great in the morning. So sleep was the biggest, biggest one for me. Yeah.

Carly Puch

Initial in that article you wrote, which I really loved about this idea of consciousness and clarity of thoughts, which I think you'd started to touch on. But I I related to that on how it kind of was this catapulting thing for me to open my mind to a lot of other issues. Can you talk a little bit more about that?

Jeffrey Boadi

So yeah, I felt like just understanding where my food was coming from made me very inquisitive in terms of Okay, so now I understand that this is where my foods coming from? What about other areas of life? What can I look at? What can I focus on? And so the main thing for me was the initial going into it was civil rights and health, but then took the next step and understood exactly, you know, how animals are treated in the industry, and that kind of suffering that I didn't want to be a part of again. And yeah, when I mentioned that clarity of thought, I just thought I just, honestly, I just felt like a sense of clarity and just a clear headedness, in it kind of everything that I did. And I was always kind of, I was always someone who was quite inquisitive and questioning things, but now I started doing it a lot more, you know, really kind of thinking critically about a lot of things, and I genuinely do feel that it had an impact just based on, you know, the foundations of changing my diet. So. So yeah, it's been it's been a really interesting journey.

Carly Puch

Speaking from my own experience, I think I had this initial reaction and, and coming from someone who grew up with a lot of privilege. as I learn more and more about the fundamental issues and some of our light on a system level. There's that initial reaction of oh my gosh, everything I know was a lie. Yeah. Did you have that feeling with learning about the, you know, the food system, the agriculture system, and just what we're taught about diet, definitely,

Jeffrey Boadi

I think that was a big a big driving factor. I felt like we've just been told the wrong things, and a lot of marketing and I always drank a lot of milk as well. So I think back to all the marketing campaigns that milk mustaches got milk, you know, all the athletes athletes, and, you know, athletes that I looked up to and thinking, you know, if they're drinking it, then obviously, you know, I'm going to drink in and I'm going to feel great. So yeah, I just felt like there was so many things. And as you say, you get to a point where you look at these things and you're like, well, actually, we've I've been told certain things which I've now done my own research on and they don't ring true. So what else I've been Hold that isn't true. So and then you start becoming really inquisitive and, and not so much like from a inverted commas conspiracy perspective, but you just because there's there's so much that we have to unlearn and relearn. And we all have that critical thinking power to look at something objectively and make our own decisions and informed decisions. That made me think that there's got to be other things out there, that we've been told, maybe misled a little bit just to fulfill a certain agenda. And just say, in terms of what we've been told about that, like, it's interesting, because one of my friends went to America, when was this like? 2012? And he kind of mentioned that about the vegan diet to me. And I was like, No, I'm not sure about that. Like, where would I get my protein? How would this work? In my mind, I imagined being just not being able to eat enough food, I just didn't work. Because we've just been, it's been drilled into us meat, protein, milk, calcium, it's just been, we've been hammered with it for so long. And then you open up your mind to that world of the plant based diet and realized that protein initially comes from plants, and so many different there are so many different plant sources of protein. So yeah, it definitely made me think that, you know, we've been told a lot of things that don't ring true. So what else is there that we could potentially unlearn and maybe relearn?

Carly Puch

Absolutely, something you touched on that I want to circle back to, that has been important for my journey, I just think, in general, is this idea that you said, you could probably get by health wise eating meat once or twice a week? Or whatever it is, but it sounds like you connect it to the greater good? Yeah. Can you talk a little bit more about that it was that with veganism that you started thinking about, like, what your role was more overall? Exactly.

Jeffrey Boadi

Because as you say, I think from a health perspective, if I was to eat, as I said, 90% plants, and maybe that that excess amount of calories from me, it probably wouldn't impact my health at all. But again, think about the way you know, government subsidies and all these different things, and big, you know, food organizations, and, you know, even certain health organizations promoting foods that are strongly linked with these, you know, degenerative chronic diseases, I just didn't want to be a part of that kind of whole thing I just didn't want to be I didn't feel comfortable being a part of that. And that's why the decision for me to make and people, I get your question that people go, No, you're still vegan? Or how long are you going to be vegan? For us, it's like, we it's just something I can't ever see myself going back to eating meat for any reason. There's no reason to do it just based on the fact that, so when you think about certain civil rights issues, and you know, all of these different things that really make you think that it's yours, it's obviously bigger than me, you know, as it's a personal perspective, I can get away with it. But I don't want to be a part of industries, which are causing so much damage to certain pockets of society, and the animals as well. So yeah, that's for me, it's just didn't really make sense.

Carly Puch

Well, I think we often underestimate our own individual power. I think so too. And in doing and making these types of choices, and even just having conversations like this, and you know, maybe even if one person is listening and thinks a little differently, but you see those arguments online? Why should I care about XYZ, really, whatever it is, specifically, I see this when environmental or foodstuff, if all these other countries or all these other populations aren't? Like, it's just the whole thing's a wash. You know, but it has to start somewhere. Maybe that's a little idealistic. But I think,

Jeffrey Boadi

as you said, we underestimate how much power we have as individuals. Because if one individual goes, oh, you know, I'm just one person, think about if 2 million people say, Oh, I'm just that one person, that's too many, right? Not having any opportunity to make a change, it will all change has to start somewhere, you know, we're not going to make, we're not going to hit that home on straightaway. We're trying to make positive changes, it's going to be step by step. And it was, you know, weeks months, then so be it, we're never going to arrive at that point that we want to straight away. And I think you know, because we live in this culture of convenience, but we want everything right away. But people need to understand, make positive change and to make changes, it's going to be that step by step process. So

Carly Puch

So you've mentioned a few times civil rights, and how that was linked into your learning and your understanding and some of the things you've been posting on social media lately, I've been really important and critical thinking I think, especially because veganism has been a pretty whitewashed space. And I think that I mean, I don't know about the UK, I think in the US. Yes, for sure. And yeah, and so I would love for you to talk a little bit more about the conversations you've been starting about race and food. And some of your posts have not only come from a historical perspective, which I think was really interesting, but then also the current climate

Jeffrey Boadi

If we go on the basis of like foods, food insecurity, for example, dimensioned. In America, there are a lot of food deserts, which are primarily people of color, there's actually a film coming out, called Kill us where they actually talk about how, you know, it's strategic in the way that they place, you know, certain foods and fast food joints in these, you know, pop communities of color where there's no supermarkets for miles. So this is like the only source of food that they have. And when you think of that a lot of these statistics that I've that I've been putting up recently, as well, like black people up to 50%, more likely to get cardiovascular disease, you know, 40% of Black people between the ages of 20 and 45, have high blood pressure, three to five times more likely to have type two diabetes. So if you think that a lot of the and a lot of these foods are obviously so strongly linked to having a poor diet, so if they're then putting these nutrition, nutritionally deficient foods, into these communities, what's then going to happen, those disease rates are just going to go straight up chronic disease, through the roof. So for me, that's something that I've been vocal about that, and obviously, having even seen it personally with my, I guess, my dad, we've been fortunate enough to not live in a food desert, but he's had, you know, certain cardiovascular events due to high meat consumption, for example. And I guess, you know, come back to in African culture where there's this high meat, you know, high meat consumption in that culture, which doesn't actually correlate with the the origins of our diet, you know. So yeah, I think there's a setting that civil rights perspective is, it's difficult to see that a lot of these food deserts, you know, in the United States and elsewhere in the UK, as well populated mostly by black communities in low income communities, where they're not able to get access to healthy food. And it just increases the disease rate. So for me, that's something that you have to be vocal about.

Carly Puch

Absolutely. So you had a post about the, what you just touched on the origins of the diet a little more, can you talk a little bit more about that, I thought it was really interesting. And something we don't talk about enough to, especially

Jeffrey Boadi

in African culture, we've been conditioned to believe that meat is the staple of our diet. Think back to even ancient Egypt, there was a lot of plant based foods that they were consuming, and a lot of the ancient grains come from, like a lot of West African areas, so foods like fonio, and teff, millet, but all grains that are local to, you know, these these countries on the continent, so and meat consumption, there was some meat consumption isn't I'm not gonna say that we were fully plant based, there was some, but nowhere near to the levels of what's being eaten now, which again, is driving up those chronic disease rates. So it's just about getting that kind of information out there. Because even coming across it myself, it's quite surprising because you know, growing up in, in a Ghanaian household, it was just me all the time, you know, I go to parties, events is just meet the law. So you think that's just how we're supposed to eat, trace it back to the origins, you know, dietary frameworks, it's a lot more plant based, a lot of grains, a lot of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, all those types of foods that in those are the ones that have kind of left the diet, essentially. And now I'm just gonna put out information so people can start to put them back in there for and for health reasons, because as I said, if people still need some meat, then that's absolutely fine. You know, but if you combine that with a diverse range of plant foods, your health outcomes are just gonna be much better.

Carly Puch

Did you I'm circling back again. Did you watch? I'm sure you have the game changer. Yeah. Okay. That was, I think such an important. Yeah, film was to be made, because it was a really good perspective. And I think what was huge and eye opening, and I hope continues to grow, is this idea of the systematic issues, kind of like what you're talking about with food deserts. And with not understanding the origins of our diet and something they brought up was marketing. Yeah. So like marketing to those communities, or just marketing in general, that there example about how, you know, there used to be commercials with Dr. Smoking cigarettes to promote which cigarette was like the best before doing a surgery. Yeah. So I think that that's another example I guess, of one really targeting certain communities with advertisements and information, but also just the systematic issues. Yeah, exactly.

Jeffrey Boadi

And that's something that's touched on in the trailer, that sort of this filament trying to kill us like the tobacco companies, Apple companies, fast food companies, they actually target communities of color. By design, if you put fast food restaurants in these communities, people are ultimately going to go anywhere. And then we think if you think about From a socio economic perspective as well, a lot of these foods are within their price range of these low income, right? So they are, it's almost like even if they wanted to eat healthy, because these, these really poor quality foods are subsidized. That's what's in their price range. So they can't actually get the fruits and vegetables and healthy foods we know are ultimately healthier for them, but it's just not within their budget. So again, that's something that is really, it's just systematic targeting of certain communities. Because you know, that they don't have the financial means to actually eat healthier. So they're you're they're literally eating essentially, what they what they have what's in their price range, even though they know it's killing them.

Carly Puch

So I believe you had a, an article on your blog about is being vegan expensive. Yes. So can you talk a little bit more about that, since we were just talking about, you know, access to food?

Jeffrey Boadi

Yeah, I think in the UK, where getting an understanding of what people think that eating vegan is expensive, but that's when people are focusing on the like the meat substitutes, and all the vegan ice creams and those kinds of things. Fruits and vegetables are actually relatively cost effective, you know, beans, cheap, like canned beans are really cheap. Rice, potato, these foods, like they're all cheap, I think in philosophy from what the research that I've done in, you know, for example, food deserts in the US, those foods are for some reason, spiked in price. And again, that's probably even more of a clear, that's clear proof that they're trying to kind of price them out of the range of, you know, communities of color. So they're forced to eat certain foods, which ultimately going to make them sick. And then you bring the pharmaceutical element into it as well, where you've got you know, that that industry thrives off people being sick, ultimately, absolutely. medications and long term drugs and surgeries and procedures. So it all ties in and it's very, very, it's a worrying situation.

Carly Puch

Yeah, it's also when you start diving into it, the different connections between all the systems is a little overwhelming to exactly think like bringing in pharmaceutical and big agriculture and all those things.

Jeffrey Boadi

Exactly. And for me, it was that watching that film, what their health is such an eye opener, understanding about how it all interlinked. And I guess I've said, That's what kind of taken me on this journey, just to put the information out there for people who may not be aware of it, essentially.

Carly Puch

So is that what made you start using your Instagram in starting a blog and doing that thing is just really wanting to disperse information.

Jeffrey Boadi

That's exactly it. For me, I think, having this information that I know now, it's no good to keep it to myself, it's good to put it out there to people, because if I can make, as I said, just one person make a positive change in their life, then I've done my job. But also, my idea is to create a community to create a movement, essentially, for people to just get healthier to eat more plant based food. And it's not not specific to people of color, even though that's very, very important to me, because anyone can make changes and be healthier in their lives. But I said particularly if peoples of people of color, just because of the disease rates that we have, you know, the propensity and the disproportionate amounts of disease that we have in our communities. So for me, it's so so important to get that information out to people and not keep it to myself, because keeping it to myself is no use.

Carly Puch

I love that idea of well, I have this information. I'm might as well share it. Yeah, I think I think that's really beautiful. Yeah, cuz

Jeffrey Boadi

I think, ultimately, like, my definition of success is, I guess how much you impact other people. That's the impact on other people. And now I've had messages from people saying, you know, they're always asking me some questions about that message going, oh, you know, you really impactful like, some really, really humbling message and Instagram that sometimes I really think I deserve, because I'm just like, I'm just sending the information out there. I shouldn't be congratulated, or, you know, thanked for it. But it's, it is nice to hear that, you know, what I am doing is having a positive impact in people's lives. So I just want to just keep doing that. And as I keep growing the community keep reaching more people with positive information, because ultimately, without your health, there's there's not much else.

Carly Puch

Yeah, it's such a baseline for everything. Right. And I don't think we value that in our western culture. Yeah, in a way, even just the way we look at food as just this thing to shovel in. Yeah, at meals instead of looking at it as something that provides us nutrition and

Jeffrey Boadi

Exactly, exactly, but I think, again, is because that's not the messaging that's been put out there. A lot of the food a lot of the efforts that we see it's all linked to, you know, the enjoyment of food and how much how will it obviously, food tasting great is important. Right? The fundamental, you know, the real point of food for me is to feel the body is to feel the cells it's provide us with energy providers and vitality. Obviously it tasted great is a is an amazing byproduct. And you know I love. I've loved cooking way more ever since going vegan love Oh, me too. I never was a cook much. But now I'm just creating so many different meals. And again, it's something that I do love sharing as well. And there's such a big vegan community where there's loads of meals, and we'll just share the food that we created to inspire people to see what they can make.

Carly Puch

But you're right, we were not given the message that food is medicine, weirdly enough. So one of the things you've talked about was, can we trust the media for nutritional advice? So I mean, I think I think we have some clues on where we're going with the answer to that. But it's an interesting question. And that's another one. I think that's hard, too hard for many myself included at the beginning to wrap my head around, like why wouldn't I trust everything I've known about food?

Jeffrey Boadi

Well, this is the thing. And I think, because the media is such a, we almost can't get away from it. It's such a powerful entity on so many levels. That people when they see the weather or the news or something in the newspaper, they immediately just take it as gospel. Old probably guilty of doing that in the past as well, you see a big, you know, newspaper or news channel, you see someone wearing a suit, they look like they know what they're talking about. And you just take what they're saying, you know that they must be right. So I guess I wrote that article, just to kind of highlight a few things in terms of how the media almost, they thrive on confusion. Because it does is it gains clicks and gets you know, people buy the news, paper because if they run the same narrative about nutrition, there's nothing you know, people just get bored of that.

Carly Puch

Oh, they thrive on confusion. Say that again?

Jeffrey Boadi

Yeah, cuz I think you know, one in one plug in one article, you see a plant based diet is great. And the next article you see are vegan diets making dumb then you see something about a Keto, then you see something about Paleo. And then what they want, they want the clicks, because that is important for their, you know, their longevity is a, you know, it's almost like an it's a sales plan for them essentially. Right? So we need to just be aware of that, and really kind of discern and do our own research about nutrition. And it can be a chore, but I think that's the only way that we're actually going to find the truth is if we dive the into the into some research, and look for ourselves and come to an informed decision, because I think a lot of people maybe aren't making informed decisions about whether it be food or they'll be by life. So they're just making choices that have been pushed onto them by media entities or, or, you know, personal personalities in the media and things like that. So yeah, it's about making those informed decisions. Well, I

Carly Puch

think we think of food as outside of almost like research and science in some ways, like food is just food. At least that's how I thought of it. Because even going to get my undergraduate degree learning about how to trust or not trust research and discern when to do that. Look at who's funding it, that that's the key one right there. Right. And I, and in my head that made sense, and like every other avenue, but I didn't connect it to Oh, who's funding that study that showed this new diet makes the most sense, because we like you said, we just learned that food is food. Yeah. So that one really changed the game for me is starting to look at where those studies are funded. And it's wild.

Jeffrey Boadi

It's crazy. And I think there was a recent one, I think it was talking about how people on a vegan diet are more prone to depression or something like that. But if you eat meat that you're you're not. And I was just like, let me go and have a look at this study just beyond the abstract. And then right in the, in the conclusion it said something along the lines of there was an unrestricted grant from the National Beef Association or something along those lines, and it just makes sense to you type two and two together. But the problem is people who read that media article, maybe wouldn't go and take that extra step to go and look at the research paper beyond the abstract and, you know, go deeper into it. They just gonna take it on face value, and run with it.

Carly Puch

And like you said, it's just the headlines are such clickbait, but then it gets shared. Exactly. It's disseminated. And then people are like, that's what they equate, even if they don't read it, that peripheral kind of Oh, I saw that article. And it was on the

Jeffrey Boadi

BBC, so it must be right look.

Carly Puch

Yeah, and I think it's so interesting. I've seen a lot of this popping up again lately, which I love. But there's this idea of, like you said, even and I thought the same thing when you start thinking about being vegan or plant based or even just eating healthier. Yeah, like, Oh, where am I gonna get my protein? Or, you know, what if I don't get all of this or whatever it is, but when I wasn't vegan, I knew nothing about nutrition. I couldn't have told you how much protein I was actually supposed to get or getting. But suddenly when you're vegan, everyone's really worried about your pet. protein intake. Or if you struggle with depression, like I have, there's that well, like was it around when you started vegan? You know, and as if like, that's the only thing that could be affecting it and not all the other food or all the other parts of life or whatever it is, like really shouldn't be worried about, like people eating Big Macs every day and the link to depression or it's wild how it suddenly becomes the scapegoat for all health problems.

Jeffrey Boadi

It's very strange to think he's actually you hit the nail on the head there when you know, there's no there's no questions when people are eating unhealthy processed foods, junk foods, you know, in these restaurants, no one questions anything, when people are smoking, even though we see the clear link between smoking and lung cancer as soon as you change your diet, and let's let's be clear, like you can obviously have an unhealthy vegan diet. Anyone knows? Oh, absolutely. You know, that's that's it's important to be clear, but a healthy whole food plant based diet has clearly been shown to be a superior diet for health in so many ways. For some reason people seem to equate everyone wants to become a nutritionist when you become you become vegan. It's so true. No one ever met. I didn't even know what b 12 was before I was on a plant based diet. And I've never heard of it I've never really focused on I took a maybe a multivitamin every now and again. But I wasn't so dialed in now with my nutrition, in terms of knowing what nutrients I'm getting, where my foods being sourced from. It's not again that I think to me, it's not just about going plant basis about actually being really, really diligent with how my nutrition is. And obviously, you know, there'll be, there might be time I might have some vegan ice cream, I might have a vegan burger on occasion, because you've still got to enjoy it from time to time. Absolutely. But I've just got such a more of a rounded understanding of nutrition, just how, what how it impacts the body if you do it, right.

Carly Puch

Yeah, I think that and that ties back to to this kind of consciousness and clarity of thought, at least for me, is just understanding food more like there was this clarity of, oh, the judgment I had for those diets or just the Miss Information. I didn't know anything to the contrary, though. Exactly. Yeah, like I didn't know what b 12 was either.

Jeffrey Boadi

This is the thing. And I think it's been such a good learning journey to me as well, just understanding everything around my nutrition. And it's not I was looking at different aspects of it as well. I'm trying to take a real holistic approach to my nutrition always going to believe that the you know, the plant based diet, unless the science radically changes. And it shows that great for you, which I doubt that's ever going to happen. But it's always good to listen to other opinions and other points of view. But to come to to make an informed decision based on the research that I do. The people who I listened to, who are pioneers in this space, whether it's doctors or certain personalities, who have a great understanding of plant based nutrition, doing the research myself. And just Yeah, being being knowledgeable in the sense of in a sense that what I'm doing from a dietary perspective is really the best for my health, but also the best for the environment and the animals as well.

Carly Puch

So when you started learning what you said, what the health was kind of your entry, yes into, how long did it take for you to kind of start diving into the animal rights issues or the environment after that initial health perspective,

Jeffrey Boadi

the finding out about how animals are treated probably took another two months, I think it was interesting, because I actually saw when plant based has like some health civil rights issues this one doing. And in that time, I'd actually bought a wallet, which was leather, but not really made the hadn't really clicked in terms of how the animals were then treated for like, for consumer goods and for food, right? How they're kind of, you know, how they how they suffer essentially. So now again, that's that was another step in consciousness. So if I want to buy a pair of trainers now, for example, I'll always make a conscious decision. So there's but there's loads of brands now that bring out vegan leather trainers, pineapple leather, so you don't actually have to contribute to that. As I said, I'd say it took another two months for me to really understand what was going on there. And you know, you watch all the videos in the slaughterhouses and how they treated for, for food for consumer goods, and those kinds of things. Again, so that was another thing that I wanted to kind of really get an understanding of and know what was going on there.

Carly Puch

So you mentioned growing up in an African household and how meat was really central. When you went plant based. Did that confuse any family members? Or did you get any comments or anything or did I'm curious how that felt for you. If if you want to speak to this from a cultural perspective, because I know I grew up in a small town On in northern Minnesota, and so I think for a lot of people like hunting and fishing, you know, growing up doing those things that feel really central to your group of people, which I did as well, it's hard to want to step away from something that feels like it was a part of you. But that's where I started to think about like, even if I enjoy the time I spend with the people doing those things, it was like the greater good thing started to kind of keep coming into my head keep coming into my head. So how was that for you?

Jeffrey Boadi

is interesting. Actually, my my parents thought I was really strange to start with me, why are you doing this, blah, blah, blah. And I'm so talking about the documentary, I tried to get them to watch it. They didn't really want to have any part of it. But I guess like, it kind of slowly got easier in the sense that my mom started getting more understanding of what I was doing like I was when I was when I was living with her. She started, you know, she was still cooking me sack meals, but she knew to maybe add beans instead of meat. So she was helpful in that regard. And then my dad was a little bit more stubborn, because as I said, a couple of cardiovascular events, one that was in my late teens, and then another my mid 20s. They're like mild heart attack and stroke. So I really kind of wanted to push him in that not pushing, but kind of guide them in that direction of just reducing the meat consumption and just the increase in the plants. And he just wasn't really having any of it. But I wouldn't surprise anyone I knew it would take time. And interestingly enough, my parents are currently in Ghana at the moment. And my mom actually called me maybe a month or two months ago, and she had said that that actually stopped eating red and white meat. And then they were only eating fish were eating loads of different plant foods, and oh, wow, that kind of stuff. And for me, that was a very, very big win. And a very, it was a very surprising, but I was very happy to hear that. Because it just shows and this has also been three years in the making, because I've been nearly three years and all his style since I went plant based yet, but for them making that change and making that decision to move away from me, even if it's just for the time being. But I'd like to see, I'd like to see go on a lot longer. That's really amazing to see. Because not only they are going to be adding more years on to their life, they're going to be healthier, they're going to be happy. And my dad is even saying that he felt lighter, he felt great. And just hearing those kinds of things was just it was music to my ears. So

Carly Puch

do you think the connection to your dad, me anticipating maybe that taking a little bit more time is the tie to meat and diet and masculinity?

Jeffrey Boadi

I'm not sure if it is with him. It was maybe related to the masculinity element. I think it's probably more of the cultural side of things just okay, eating me is a Ghanian man got to do that. You know, it's part of the culture, it's ingrained in the culture. But I think, as I said, my mother I can my mom was probably the one who maybe was driving the consumption of less meat and more plants. And it's a little bit of fishing there as well. And I was bored, he would have probably been a bit, a bit of a tough nut to crack to get him to do it. But he's enjoying it from what I've been hearing from him. You know, I speak to them regularly. So yeah, they're really happy about it. And I'm so I'm just happy that, as I said, especially for my dad, where he's had certain health issues, you know, he's really going to be adding years on to his life.

Carly Puch

That's amazing. Good for them. Yeah, definitely. So the vegan scene in the United States feels like it's been really booming lately and options and options, even at restaurants that you wouldn't expect to. I mean, just from a marketing standpoint, I think it's a smart idea to have those options right as it's part of the more the current conversation. How is it in the UK?

Jeffrey Boadi

Yeah, it's definitely getting a lot bigger in the UK as well. You seeing a lot of poor pop up events that are starting vegan restaurants popping up that is really really good ones in London now as well. And yeah, as I said, certain restaurants you may not have thought about vegan options, and now getting it at the very least one or two. And in most cases, you have like a vegan section. And most restaurants so yeah, it's becoming really really popular. I think more and more people are doing it more and more people are becoming aware of the reasons as to why I guess in terms of millennials, people wanting to have more of an impact on the greater good. So the environmental issues that people focus a lot on when it when it comes to turning to veganism. So yeah, that's a said it definitely is booming here. And I can only see it growing as well.

Carly Puch

That's amazing. It's on my list of places to travel once. All this is over. So hopefully someday I get to check out the vegan scene there.

Jeffrey Boadi

Definitely. I'm sure you love it. Sure.

Carly Puch

So I'm curious as one of the things I think you list on either your website or Instagram is at Wellness Advocate. So what does that mean to you? Is that go beyond food or what does that what does that mean?

Jeffrey Boadi

Yeah, so I think because obviously that is important, but it's not the only thing that you should be doing to make It's not as your health, obviously, I thought I used to play football and travel to different countries to do it. So how like fitness, from my perspective is a very important thing. I always advocate for just consistently moving your body, even if it's at a low level. If you think about some of the longest populations in the world, in the blue zones, one of the things that they say before them is kind of low level exercise, but constantly to the console, moving constantly, whether it's gardening or going to see friends, they're always moving. And you know, in this kind of Western society, where we're kind of chained to, a lot of us are chained to our desk